Many film critics become film makers themselves. Peter Bogdanovich, for example, was a film critic who borrowed freely from the directors, writers and actors he interviewed (plus he got a free pass to the movies). Nice work if you can get it. Here's a list of the most famous film critics:


Agee, James

(1910-1955) As a film critic, he wrote for Time and The Nation throughout the forties. Screenplays include The African Queen


Anderson, Lindsay

(1923-). Born in India and educated in Britain, he wrote for The London Times, The Observer, and The New Statesman. He won an academy award for his film Thursday's Children (1954), U.K.). He also appeared as a schoolmaster in the British film Chariots of Fire


Arnheim, Rudolph

(1904-) A German born theorist, Arnheim analyzed the differences between film and other art forms. His most famous essays were collected and printed in Film As Art


Barthes, Roland

(1915-1980) French social and literary critic. Notable works include Le Degré Zéro de l'Acriture (Writing Degree Zero) (1953), Mythologies (1957) and A Barthes Reader (1987), edited by Susan Sontag


Bazin, André

(1918-1958). His works highlight the role of film in capturing reality as it unfolds with no creative interference. According to him, this is best accomplished using deep focus and mise-en-scène rather than montage, as in Citizen Kane (1941)


Benjamin, Walter

(1892-1940)A true theorist, Benjamin explored film as an infinitely reproducibile work of art that is inherently less valuable than a singular art object. He explores this idea in the essay "The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction" 1935.


Bergman, Andrew

(1945-) Film historian, screenwriter and director. Before turning to screenwriting and directing, he wrote two well-known film histories. We're In The Money (1971) and A Biography of James Cagney (1975). He went on to write and co-write the screenplays for several successful comedies, including Blazing Saddles (1974) and The In Laws (1979). His directing credits include The Freshmen(1990), for which he also wrote the screenplay.


Bogdanovich, Peter

(1939-). Before making films, he wrote a series of books and articles for the Museum of Modern Art in The New Yorker and Esquire. As a director, his films include The Last Picture Show, (1971), Paper Moon, (1973), and Daisy Miller (1974).


Bordwell, David

(1947-) Books include Narration in the Fiction Film (1985), Film Art (1993) and Planet Hong Kong: Popular Cinema and the Art of Entertainment (2000)


Braudy, Leo

(1941-). American film historian. Books include Great Film Directors: A Critical Anthology (1978; editor)


Brownlow, Kevin

(1938-). British director, film editor and film historian. Books include The Parade's Gone By (1968) and Hollywood: The Pioneers (1979).


Bogdanovich, Peter

(1939-). Before making films, he wrote a series of books and articles for the Museum of Modern Art in New York and Esquire. As a director, his films include The Last Picture Show, (1971), Paper Moon, (1973), and Daisy Miller (1974).


Brady, Leo

(1941-) American film critic and historian. His texts include Great Film Directors: A Critical Anthology(1978; editor) and a study of Jean Renoir's films. In his work, he examines components that make up the total experience of the film.


Brownlow, Kevin

(1938-). British Director, film editor, and film historian. A film maker since the 1950's It Happened Here1966, U.K., co-dir., co-prod., co-sc.), he gained great praise (and honour from the French government for his neary lifelong project to restore Abel Gance's 1927 silent film Napoleon. Among his well-regarded books are The Parade's Gone By (1968) and Hollywood: The Pioneers


Brownlow, Kevin

(1938-). British director, film editor and film historian. Books include The Parade's Gone By (1968) and Hollywood: The Pioneers (1979).


Corliss, Richard (1944-).

American film and literary critic. He wrote for the National Review from 1966 to 1970 and later worked for the Museum of Modern Art in New York. Since 1980, he has been the film reviewer for Time. He has written a text on screenwriters, a monograph on Lolita(1994), and essays on Casablanca and Greta Garbo


Cowie, Peter(1939-)

. British film scholar, he has written about the world of film. His most famous works are The Cinema of Orson Welles 1965-1973) and Eighty Years of Cinema 1978, an overview of world cinema


Crowther, Bosley(1905-1981). American film critic. He began his career with the The Boston Phoenix and then reviewed films from The Atlantic from 1970 to 1973. His reviews have appeared in The New York Times, Harper's, Sight and Sound, Film Quarterly, and the New Yorker. He edited the book Awake Criticism, 1915-present (1977).

Brownlow, Kevin (1938-). British director, film editor and film historian. Books include The Parade's Gone By (1968) and Hollywood: The Pioneers (1979).

Denby, David(1943-). An American film critic, he began his career with the Boston Phoenix and then reviewed films for The Atlantic from 1970 to 1973. His reviews have appeared in The New York Times, Harper's, Sight and Sound, Film Quarterly, and The New Yorker. He edited the book Awake in The Dark: An Anthology of American Film Criticism, 1915 - present

Ebert, Roger (1942-) American film critic. He started at the Chicago Sun Timesin 1967 and won the Pulitzer Prize for criticism in 1975. He and Gene Siskel (1947-1999 appeared in in At The Movies and Siskel and Ebert. His books include A Kiss Is Still A Kiss(1984) annual editions of Roger Ebert's Movie Yearbook, Roger Ebert's Book of Film, and The Great Movies which was an essay on 100 classic films. He lectures on film at the University of Chicago Fine Arts and is an adjunct professor of cinema studdies at the University of Illinois at Urbana, where he holds his annual Overlooked Film Festival.

Eisenstein, Sergei(1898-1948). Russian director and film theorist. Trained as an engineer, he began to sketch caricatures during the advent of the Russian Revolution. While serving in the Red Army, he directed small productions with his fellow servicemen. He also became interested in Japanese culture and the pictographic structure of the language. His ideas about film revolve around the principle of montage -- the linking together of dispirate images to produce a meaning. His best film Battleship Of The Potemkin has been a staple of study in film courses around the world.

Everson, William K.(1929-). British-born American film historian and collector. Owner of one of the largest independent film collections in the United States, he is also the author of several important film texts, including a history of the silent film era, American Silent Film (1978). He has written on westerns, W.C.Fields and Hal Roach.

Giannetti, Louis D. American film scholar. The author of an important introduction to film Understanding Movies (1976), he has also written on the aesthetics of cinema and films of Jean-Luc Godard.

Greene, Graham(1904-1991. British film critic, novelist and screenwriter. His novels include The End Of The Affair (1951). Many of his books were adapted for the screen, some by Greene himself, such as Brighton Rock/Young Scarface (1947) and Our Man in Havana (1959).

Halliwell, Leslie(1929-1989). His most famous book is The Film Goer's Companion, a reference book that is still used to this day by film critics. He also wrote a guide to films with his personal ratings, Halliwell's Film Guide and a book of film quotes.

Haskell, Molly(1939-). American film critic. She is a documenter of women in film. Her most famous book is From Reverence to Rape (1974). Other books include Holding My Own In No Man's Land (1997). Her film reviews can be heard on National Public Radio and read in The Village Voice, Vogue and New York magazine. She is married to film critic Andrew Sarris.